Prevention

Prevention

The prevention of Malaria can be done through malaria vaccine though the vaccine poses major challenges as a comprehensive vaccine would need to be effective against a number of strains of malaria parasites. As such, the majority of vaccines in development are focused on the most serious and deadly parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. The development of a vaccine against P. vivax is complicated by the associated relapses and hypnozoite stages of infection with this parasite.

The malaria vaccine that may soon be approved for use in humans is called RTS, S/AS01 and was developed through a partnership between GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals (GSK) and the PATH Malaria Vaccine Initiative (MVI), with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

This vaccine has completed Phase III testing and, in 2015, the European Medicines Agency (EMA) issued "a European scientific opinion" that indicated that they had assessed the vaccine as favorable in terms of its risk/benefit from a regulatory perspective. Although the vaccine is not licensed or approved for use in Europe, this statement may help regulatory authorities in Africa reach a decision on licensure.11

This vaccine is effective against P. falciparum only; it affords no protection against P. vivax malaria.